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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

America's Biggest Mercury Polluters

Power plants continue to release large amounts of toxic pollutants, including mercury, into our air. In 2010, two-thirds of all airborne mercury pollution in the United States came from the smokestacks of coal-fired power plants. In other words, power plants generate more airborne mercury pollution than all other industrial sources combined.

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News Release | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Report: Charlotte in country's top ten for smog

Charlotte–The Charlotte area has had more unhealthy air days in 2011 than all but seven other cities nationwide, according to a new Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center report released today at Plaza Presbyterian Weekday School in Plaza-Midwood.  The analysis, Danger in the Air: Unhealthy Air Days in 2010 and 2011, also showed that under the more protective smog standard President Obama delayed early this month, the number of days officially considered unhealthy to breathe in Charlotte could more than double.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Danger in the Air

Charlotte–The Charlotte area has had more unhealthy air days in 2011 than all but seven other cities nationwide, according to a new Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center report released today at Plaza Presbyterian Weekday School in Plaza-Midwood.  The analysis, Danger in the Air: Unhealthy Air Days in 2010 and 2011, also showed that under the more protective smog standard President Obama delayed early this month, the number of days officially considered unhealthy to breathe in Charlotte could more than double.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Too Much at Stake

In the long debate over management of the outer continental shelf (OCS), the oil industry and some policy makers have claimed that our tax base and coastal jobs rely on expanding oil and gas drilling to new places.

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Report | Environment North Carolina Research & Policy Center

Unfulfilled Promise

Raleigh--In ten years, North Carolina has permanently protected more than 640,000 acres of parks, forests, farmlands, and such critical areas as Grandfather Mountain, Chimney Rock, and the banks of the Haw River.  Yet, according to a new Environment North Carolina study, the state fell well short of a goal set by legislators and former Gov. Jim Hunt to reach the million-acre mark by December 31, 2009.

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